Knowledge of Client Group

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Overview: 

Those working on earning this badge will gain skills in understanding how to connect with teens and community organizations to learn about the technology needs and interests of adolescents.

To earn the badge the learner will go through each of the steps including:

  • Reading reports from the Pew Research about teens in the digital age
  • Learning from teens about their use of technology to learn first-hand about what's going on in the community.
  • Working with community organizations to develop opportunities to build relationships with teens.
  • Developing a visualization to present to youth serving organizations to help in developing services for teens..

If at any time in the process of working on a badge you need help on developing your badge project materials, see our screencasts on the Help page of the site.

Goals: 
  • To give badge earners the chance to learn about the interests and behaviors of teens related to current technologies.
  • To give badge earners the chance to focus on teens in their community and those teens own interests and use of current technologies.
  • To give badge earners the chance to expand relationships with teens in the community.
  • To give badge earners the chance to advocate for teen use of technology in formal and informal learning environments.
Tech required: 

Google Drive apps. You will develop Google Docs and visualization tools as a part of earning this badge and link to each of the items you create when you are ready to submit your badge for review and feedback. (A getting started with Google Apps screencast is available.)

Steps: 
  • As you work on the steps in this badge earning process remember to consult the badge rubric and keep in mind the requirements of the rubric and how to create a set of high-quality project materials.

  • Read the Pew Research Center Report: Teens, Technology, and Friendships.

  • Read the Pew Research Center Report: Teens, Technology, and Relationships.

  • Review the data from the Pew Research Center on the Teens Voices: Dating website.

  • Contact two or three community organizations in which teens spend time and organize opportunities for you to spend some time with teens in those settings in order to learn about their use of technology as a friendship and relationship tool. It's likely that for you to be able to learn about teens, technology, and relationships that you will have to build your own relationships with teens before asking lots of questions. Work with the community organizations that you decide to "target" to develop some activities you can work on with teens in order to develop the relationships before asking the questions. Read the article What Teens Think Does Matter by K-Fai Steele in the Summer 2013 issue of YALS.

  • Write about the organizations you are working with and the activities you develop for and with teens using the Google Doc provided.

  • Once you collect data from teens create visuals to present to the organizations you worked with when connecting with the teens. In thinking about the visuals you'll create think about what data is most to the library and the organizations you worked with to connect with the teens. As you think about the visuals you'l create ask yourself: What was surprising about what we learned? What gives us insight into how we can best support teens use of technology related to relationships and friendships? What do we need to tell others about? The answers to those questions can guide you in deciding what to visualize as a part of this project.

  • Use the Google Doc to learn more about creating visualizations and to post links to the visuals you create.

  • Complete the badge earning process by setting up a meeting with the organizations you worked with to connect with teens to go over the data and talk about what impact the information has for the work you do with and for teens in the community. Before you leave the meeting come up with at least one idea that you and the organizations can work on together that connects to what you learned. Write about the idea and the meeting(s) on the Google Doc provided.

  • Before submitting the materials you created for review by the badge earning community, remember to consult the badge rubric and keep in mind the requirements of the rubric and how to create a set of high-quality project materials.